Thomas Straubhaar Leipziger Buchmesse 2017

Thomas Straubhaar is a Swiss economist and migration researcher. He is Professor of International Economic Relations at the University of Hamburg. Photo: Heike Huslage-Koch

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#FUTURIUMFORUM: DIGITAL TALK SERIES: 10 June, 20:15

Dear Thomas Straubhaar, is it all over now for globalisation?

#FuturiumForum: One state of emergency and back? This is the title of a new series of talks by Futurium. Guest this time is the Member of the Bundestag and Minister of State for Europe, Michael Roth. On Wednesday, 10 June, from 20:15, the discussion will be available here.

Thomas Straubhaar Leipziger Buchmesse 2017

Thomas Straubhaar is a Swiss economist and migration researcher. He is Professor of International Economic Relations at the University of Hamburg. Photo: Heike Huslage-Koch

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The video is available on 10 June from 20:15.

Guest of the evening

The Swiss economist and migration researcher Thomas Straubhaar has been Professor of International Economic Relations at the University of Hamburg since 1999. In an interview with NDR radio, the economist said he could imagine that the Corona Crisis might lead to a partial departure from globalization and a return to local production. In view of the corona restrictions, he called for a return to the market economy as quickly as possible: "Market economy is not everything. However, it is in a much better position than a state-planned economy to make prosperity possible for all."

The pandemic shows us how globally networked our current economic system is and how great the interdependencies are. Due to temporary failures, border closures and changing demand, many industries experienced difficulties in their supply chains. The global economic system, which is based on a high degree of specialization, began to falter. Instead of global commodity markets, domestic heating engineers, car manufacturers and spirits producers supplied the necessary equipment and disinfectants. At the same time, border closures and strict entry regulations meant that global mobility was at a record low. Globalization seems to be paused, for the time being. How could the experiences from the Corona crisis affect our economic system in the long term? Should there be a turning away from globalization or should we use the occasion to make it better and fairer? Will other values play a role in the future? Security instead of risk and solidarity and responsibility instead of efficiency and growth? And how might the relationship between market and state change?

ABOUT THE TALK SERIES

How does the view of the future change in a state of emergency? The corona pandemic and the way we deal with it shake up many things that otherwise seemed self-evident to us. The digitizability of life, recognition for everyday heroes and the social significance of culture, sport and nightlife - all this and much more is being put to the test. Where do social imbalances reveal themselves? Which foundations of everyday life are indispensable? What is really important to us when it really matters? And what consequences will people draw in the future? We want to discuss these questions in 30-minute digital talks with people from science, politics, business, civil society and the creative scene.

The recording of the conversation will be available here on Wednesday, 10 June from 20:15.

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